Why Is My Car So Hot – and Other Summer Car Questions

August 1st, 2019 by

The summer months bring opportunities for new adventures with your vehicle, but along with that comes the heat. Enjoy the summer without melting away with these car care tips. 

 

 

 

Why is My Car So Hot Inside? 

Much like an oven, when the sun heats your vehicle there’s nowhere for the hot air to escape. The heat becomes trapped and intensified when there is no airflow. Within twenty minutes the inside of your car will become much hotter than the outside. 

 

To help prevent your vehicle from heating up, park in the shade and roll your windows down an inch if you are parked in a safe area. Windshield Sun Shades can protect your dash from sun damage if you regularly use them. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why Is My A/C Blowing Hot Air? 

This could be from several things, but it doesn’t necessarily mean your A/C is “broken.” If this occurs only when you start your vehicle, this is because your vehicle is full of hot air. The easiest way to prevent this is to simply open your windows until you think most of the hot air has escaped and continue to use your air as normal. 

 

If this does not solve your problem, it could be due to electrical problems or a leak. Visit our service shop to have your A/C inspected if this could be the issue. 

 

Should I Roll the Windows Down or Use Air Conditioning? 

Driving down the highway with your windows rolled down may feel like a scene out of a movie, but it could be costing you more gas than you thought. 

 Car interior / Air conditioner

 

Opening the window creates drag. This will cause your vehicle to use more gas and power than it should. Your air conditioning will use less gas than your engine trying to keep up with the drag. 

 

It’s Not Cold, Why Did My Battery Die? 

Extreme temperatures wreak havoc on your battery, hot or cold. If your vehicle’s battery is having difficulty keeping up it’s time to bring it in for an inspection and possible replacement. 

 

 

How Did My Tires Get So Hot Parked in the Driveway? 

As you already know, you weren’t driving, yet your tires are hot. Newer tires have more rubber and tent to get hotter faster. Hot tires increase the chance of a blowout, so if you think the temperature is too hot for your vehicle to handle, stick to city driving at lower speeds. 

 Illustration of Orange Sedan

 

Check your tire pressure every month to make sure it is between 32-35 psi. 

 

 

Can your car take the heat? Visit our service shop to find out! 

 

 

Posted in Did You Know